Your Gate For Hospitality ....                                               Our Dear Guest,  we have the pleassure and happiness to have you with us.                                                                   Welcome to our hotle.                                                                  Why Cairo Khan Hotel ?                                     Cairo Khan Hotel located at downtown near touristic sites, shopping and entertainment centers of Cairo.
 
 
Cairo Information
 
  Sights
Khan al-Khalili
-

Commercial activity has been the life blood of this marketplace since the end of the 14th century. The Khan is a maze of small streets, narrow alleys, and passages filled with scores of vendors hawking their wares and attempting to draw customers into their small shops. It is a chaotic mixture of Egyptians and tourists, smells of perfume and incense, fragments of age-old buildings next to modern amenities -- and always noise and confusion. With a little determination, you can find just about anything you want -- gold and silver jewelry, leatherwork, glassware, fabrics, spices -- to take home as proof of your trip. A few words of advice: never take something at the first price; bargaining is the modus operandi in the Khan, and if you do not show interest, the price is likely to drop. Stores generally are open 10-9 Monday through Saturday; most close on Sunday and during Friday prayer (the hour around noon; 1 PM during daylight saving time between April and October).



Mosque of Ibn Tulun
Shar'a Tulun Bay
Cairo
-

This huge congregational mosque was built in 879 by Ahmad Ibn Tulun with the intention of accommodating his entire army during Friday prayers. Separated from the streets around it with a ziyada (a walled-off space), the mosque covers an area of more than 6 acres. The vast courtyard is surrounded by four arcaded aisles. The soffits of the arches are covered in beautifully carved stucco, the first time this medium was used in Cairo. The minaret, the only one of its kind in Egypt, is modeled after the minarets of Samarra, with the zigguratlike stairs spiraling on the outside of the tower. COST: EGP6.



Step Pyramid
Saqqara
-

This pyramid complex was built in the 3rd Dynasty (2649-2575 BC) for the pharaoh Djoser by his architect Imhotep. It earned Djoser, and more importantly Imhotep, everlasting fame -- Imhotep was later deified and regarded as the patron god of architects and doctors. The pyramid is completely unlike those of the 4th and 5th Dynasties. It was the first stone pyramid (and complex) to be built in Egypt, and its form imitates wood, papyrus, mud brick, and matting in limestone. The site was a great attraction in antiquity: As the graffiti attest, people came here as tourists and seekers of blessings from as early as the Middle Kingdom (2040-1640 BC), if not earlier. COST: EGP20; additional EGP5 to use your camera and EGP25 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.



Qa'a of Muhhib al-Din
Shar'a al-Mu'iz
Cairo
-

This qa'a (great hall) has little to distinguish it save a small plaque (if the door isn't open, knock and the custodian will appear; otherwise just walk in and find him). Inside is one of the greatest spaces in Islamic Cairo: a hall that towers 50 ft, with exquisite wood and stone carving. Also known as the house of Uthman Kathkhuda, after the 18th-century Ottoman lieutenant who converted the original 14th-century Mamluk qa'a, the hall has superb features from both periods. COST: Baksheesh suggested.



Museum of Islamic Arts
Shar'a Bur Sa'id at Maydan Ahmad Maher
Cairo
02-3909930

Too often overlooked, this is one of the finest museums in Cairo. Its extensive collection contains mainly Egyptian art, but there are pieces from elsewhere in the Islamic world as well. Arranged according to medium, they illustrate every era of development -- from Ummayad to Abbasid, Fatimid, Ayyubid, and Mamluk works. You can see woodwork, stucco, intarsia, ceramics, glass, metalwork, textiles, and carpets. COST: EGP16. Sat.-Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-11 and 2-4.



Citadel
al-Qala'a, Shar'a Salih Salem
Cairo
-

Before Salah al-Din al-Ayyubi, local rulers had overlooked the strategic value of the hill above the city. Within a few years of his arrival in Cairo in 1168, he began making plans for the defense of the city, with al-Qala'a (the fortress) the key element. He and his successors built an impenetrable bastion, using the most advanced construction techniques of the age. For the next 700 years, Egypt was ruled from this hill. Nothing remains of the original complex except a part of the walls and Bir Yusuf, the well that supplied the Citadel with water. The Ayyubid walls that circle the northern enclosure are 33 ft tall and 10 ft thick; they and their towers were built with the experience gleaned from the Crusader wars.
During the 1330s al-Nasir Muhammad, who ruled on three different occasions for a total of 42 years (AD 1293-1340) and was considered the greatest Mamluk sultan, tore down most of the Ayyubid buildings to make room for his own needs, which included several palaces and a mosque in addition to barracks for his army. These, too, were not to last, for when the Ottoman viceroy Muhammad 'Ali assumed power in the 1800s he had all the Mamluk buildings razed and the complex entirely rebuilt; only the green-domed mosque and a fragment of al-Qasr al-Ablaq (the striped palace) remain. The Citadel's appearance today is really the vision of Muhammad 'Ali, particularly the mosque that bears his name. The Muhammad 'Ali Mosque is the most noticeable in all of Cairo. For more than 150 years it has dominated the skyline, making it almost the symbol of the city. This is ironic because it is actually an imitation of the graceful Ottoman mosques in Istanbul. Notice the alabaster facing on the outside. The interior reflects a somewhat gaudy attempt to weld Middle Eastern and French rococo and is finished with ornate lines of red, green, and gold. Nevertheless, there are interesting aspects to the place. Ottoman law prohibited anyone but the sultan from building a mosque with more than one minaret, but this mosque has two. Indeed, this was one of Muhammad 'Ali's first indications that he did not intend to remain submissive to Istanbul. Behind Muhammad 'Ali's gilded beast stands a far more elegant creature, the Mosque of al-Nasir Muhammad. The beautifully crafted masonry, the elegant proportions, the ornate but controlled work on the minarets -- all indicate that the building is a Mamluk work of art. The conquering Ottomans carried much of the original interior decoration off to Istanbul, but the space is nevertheless impressive. The supporting columns around the courtyard were collected from various sources and several are pharaonic. . COST: EGP20. Daily 8-5.


Gayer-Anderson Museum
4 Maydan Ibn Tulun
Cairo
02-3647822

Also known as Bayt al-Kiritliya, the museum consists of two Ottoman houses joined together, restored, and furnished by Major Gayer-Anderson, a British member of the Egyptian civil service in the 1930s and '40s. Gayer-Anderson was a talented collector and the house's contents include lovely pieces of pharaonic, Islamic, and Central Asian art. Spend some time in the reception room, where a mosaic fountain lies at the center of an ornate marble floor. In the courtyard of the east house is the "Well of Bats," the subject of much storytelling in the neighborhood. COST: EGP16. Daily 8-5; closed during Friday prayers.



Mosque and Madrasa of Sultan Hassan
Maydan Salah al-Din
Cairo
-

Built between 1356 and 1363 by the Mamluk ruler Sultan Hassan, this is one of the largest Islamic religious buildings in the world. Historians believe that its builders may have used stone from the pyramids at Giza. The scale of the masterpiece is so colossal that it nearly emptied the vast Mamluk Treasury.
You enter the complex at an angle, through a tall portal that is itself a work of art. A dark and relatively low-ceilinged passageway to the left of the entrance leads to the brightly lit main area, a standard cruciform-plan open court. Between each of the four liwans (sitting rooms) is a madrasa (religious school), one for each of the four Sunni schools of jurisprudence, complete with its own courtyard and four stories of cells for students and teachers. The mausoleum, facing the Maydan Salah al-Din, is quite beautiful, particularly in the morning when the rising sun filters through grilled windows. COST: EGP12. Daily 8-5, except during Friday prayers.


Coptic Museum
Shar'a Mari Girgis
Cairo
02-3628766

Housing the world's largest collection of Coptic Christian artwork, this museum provides a link between ancient and Islamic Egypt. The museum is classified by medium, more or less. The first floor has carved stone and stucco, frescoes, and woodwork. The second floor includes textiles, manuscripts, icons, and metalwork. The collection includes many exquisite pieces, but several are noteworthy first for their quirkiness or their syncretism, rather than their beauty: carvings and paintings that trace the transformations of the ancient key of life, the ankh, into the cross, for example, and Christian scenes with Egyptian gods. For a detailed guide of the museum, look for Jill Kamil's Coptic Egypt: History and Guide (American University in Cairo Press). COST: EGP16. Sun.-Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-noon and 1-4.



Hanging Church
Shar'a Mari Girgis
Cairo
-

Known in Arabic as al-Muallaqah ("the suspended"), the church is consecrated to the Blessed Virgin. Originally built in the 9th century on top of a gatehouse of the Roman fortress, the Hanging Church has been rebuilt several times, like most of Cairo's churches. Only the section to the right of the sanctuary, above the southern bastion, is considered original. Nevertheless, it remains one of the most impressive churches in the city, remarkable for its marble pulpit, inlaid screens, and paintings. Call ahead to determine if restorations will affect your visit. COST: Free. Daily 9-4 (except during services).



Chaar-Hachamaim Synagogue
Shar'a Adly, opposite Kodak Passage
Cairo
-

This unusual concrete block with a subtle Art Nouveau floral motif is easily overlooked from the outside. Arrive early, passport in hand, act unthreatening -- the security guards are touchy about letting people in -- and one of Cairo's great hidden treasures awaits, with an interior of exquisite stained-glass windows and light fixtures rumored to be from Tiffany's. Erected in 1905 by the Mosseri family, the synagogue is seldom used because there are too few remaining Jewish men to hold a service. Opening hours are not fixed, but mornings (Sunday through Friday) are the best time to visit.



Egyptian Antiquities Museum
al-Mathaf al-Masri, Maydan Tahrir
Cairo
02-5754319

At the north end of Maydan Tahrir is a huge neoclassical building that houses the world's largest collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts. With more than 100,000 items in total, it is said that if you were to spend just one minute on each item, it would take over nine months to complete the tour. Needless to say, you need to be selective, and it's a good idea to hire a museum guide or buy the comprehensive and practical Egyptian Museum in Cairo: Official Catalogue (EGP100). The famous Tutankhamun collection is on the museum's upper floor; look for its beautiful gold funerary mask and sarcophagus, ancient trumpet, thrones, the four huge gilded boxes that fit one inside the other, and a royal toilet seat to boot. Also upstairs is the royal Mummy Room, which houses 11 pharaonic dignitaries. If you are discouraged by the Mummy Room's steep entrance fee, don't miss the assortment of mummified animals and birds in the adjacent room, which has no additional charge. COST: EGP20; Mummy Room EGP40; additional EGP10 to use your camera and EGP100 to use your video recorder. Daily 9-4:30.



Khufu's Pyramid
Giza
-

If you choose one pyramid to go into, make it the Great Pyramid of Khufu. The sheer mass of it, pierced by the elegant Grand Gallery leading to the burial chamber, is one of the wonders of the world -- ancient and modern. The oldest and largest monument at the Giza site, the Great Pyramid measures 753 ft square and 478 ft high, and it is the only one of the seven wonders of the ancient world remaining today. Its casing stones, once covered by graffiti dating from pharaonic times, were systematically stripped in the Middle Ages for a variety of Cairene building projects, leaving the structure as you see it today. The pyramid took some 20 years for the pharaoh Khufu to build, and it is one of two pyramids that contains the burial chamber within its body. Five boat pits surround Khufu's Pyramid on the south and the east. Two of these, the southern ones, contain cedar boats that the pharaoh probably used during his lifetime. One of these is in the Boat Museum, and it may even have been used on the pharaoh's last voyage from the capital of Memphis to his tomb at Giza. When found in the 1960s, it lay dismantled in its limestone pit, sealed by 40 roofing slabs. Its 1,200 pieces, originally joined together by halfa-grass ropes and sycamore pegs, were painstakingly reassembled by the late conservationist Hajj Ahmed Yusif over the course of 14 years.
. COST: EGP40, EGP20 additional Boat Museum; additional EGP10 to use your camera and EGP100 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.


Khafre's Pyramid
Giza
-

The pyramid of Khufu's son is the second-largest on the Giza site. It measures 702 ft square and stands 470 ft tall. It looks taller than Khufu's Pyramid because it stands on a slightly higher part of the plateau and because it still retains part of its fine limestone casing -- brought from the quarries at Tura in the cliffs on the eastern bank of the Nile -- at its summit. Like Khufu's complex, this one includes five boat pits (empty of boats), together with mortuary and valley temples and a connecting causeway some 430 yards long carved out of the living rock. The burial chamber, which is underground, contains a red granite sarcophagus with its lid. Next to this is a square cavity that presumably once held the canopic chest containing the pharaoh's viscera. COST: EGP20; additional EGP10 to use your camera (no video recorders). Daily 8-4.



Great Sphinx
Al-Haram
Giza
-

The "enigmatic" Sphinx, part human and part feline, is attached to Khafre's Pyramid complex, just north of his valley temple, with a separate temple (now very much destroyed) of its own. The figure of a recumbent lion with a man's face wearing the nemes (traditional headdress of the pharaoh), is thought to be Khafre in the guise of Re-Harakhte, a manifestation of the sun god, and, in this case, a guardian of the necropolis. The Sphinx was carved from living rock, with additional details and the final casing made of limestone blocks. The monument used to sport a uraeus (the royal cobra) on its forehead and had a beard that has fallen off, bit by bit, through the ages. COST: EGP20; Sound-and-Light Show EGP33.50. Daily 8-4; Sound-and-Light Show (in English), Fri.-Wed. 6:30 PM in winter, 7:30 PM in summer.



Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep's Mastaba
Saqqara
-

Also known as the Tomb of Two Brothers, or the Tomb of the Hairdressers, this 5th Dynasty tomb is noted for its fine colors, as well as the unusually intimate poses of the two tomb owners. Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep worked as the pharaoh's body servants, and they were buried together in this exquisitely decorated joint tomb. An unusual scene of the tomb owners on donkey back is carved on the second set of door jambs. COST: EGP10 (plus EGP20 general admission); additional EGP5 to use your camera and EGP25 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.



Mereruka's Mastaba
Saqqara
-

Shared by Mereruka's son and wife, this is the largest mastaba tomb in Saqqara. It dates to the 6th Dynasty (2323-2150 BC) and shows some of the finest scenes of fishing, hunting, metalworking (note the dwarfs), sailing, and force-feeding of animals, including a hyena in the statue chamber. A statue of Mereruka emerging from a niche marks the main offering spot for his cult. Kagemni's Mastaba adjoins the mastaba of Mereruka and is also well decorated. Presumably the artist or atelier responsible for decorating the mastabas in this area was the same, because certain scenes keep reappearing. COST: EGP20; additional EGP5 to use your camera and EGP25 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.



North Pyramid
Al-Haram Dahshur
Menshat Dahshur
-

Also known as the Red Pyramid -- named for the pinkish limestone of which it is made -- the North Pyramid belonged to the 4th-Dynasty pharaoh Sneferu (2575-2551 BC), father of Khufu. It is the second of Sneferu's two pyramids -- the other is the Bent Pyramid -- and marks the first successful attempt at building a true pyramid. The North Pyramid contains three chambers with corbeled roofs and a plethora of 19th-century graffiti. COST: EGP10 site including North Pyramid entry; additional EGP5 to use your camera and EGP25 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.



Bent Pyramid
Al-Haram Dahshur
Menshat Dahshur
-

Built for Sneferu, this was the first pyramid to have been planned as a true pyramid, as opposed to a step pyramid. It is 599 ft square and its original height was 344 ft, and it retains much of its limestone cladding. Its unusual bent angle seems to have occurred because the builders felt that the initial angle was too steep, and that the pyramid would collapse if they did not adjust it. This pyramid is also unusual in that it has two entrances: the typical north-face entrance, and a second in the west face that is just visible above the change in the angle. COST: EGP10 site including North Pyramid entry; additional EGP5 to use your camera and EGP25 to use your video recorder. Daily 8-4.
 
 
Copy Right Received © 2004 Designed & Developed by UEG2000